A Lecture on Ethics  1929 By Ludwig Wittgenstein My subject, as you know, is Ethics and I will adopt the explanation of that term which Professor Moore has given in his book Principia Ethica. He says: “Ethics is the general inquiry into what is good.” Now I am going to use the term Ethics in […]

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by  Ludwig Wittgenstein. (Logisch-Philosophische Abhandlung (1921) Introduction   By Bertrand Russell Mr Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, whether or not it prove to give the ultimate truth on the matters with which it deals, certainly deserves, by its breadth and scope and profundity, to be considered an important event in the philosophical world. Starting from the principles of […]

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(LW stands for Ludwig Wittgenstein, PU for “Philosophische Untersuchungen”.) The origin of the private language argument 1. The meaning of a word is the object the word stands for (PU 1). 2. Sensations are private. Hence a language that refers to private objects could only be understood by the owner of the sensations (PU 243). […]

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From: Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations. 89-92. 106-133.  89. In what sense is logic something sublime? For there seemed to pertain to logic a peculiar depth–a universal significance. Logic lay, it seemed, at the bottom of all the science.–For logical investigation explores the nature of all things. It seeks to see to the bottom of things and is […]

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Wittgenstein: Philosophical Investigations. 587-594; 611-629.         587. It makes sense to ask: ‘Do I really love her, or am I only pretending to myself?’ and the process of introspection is the calling up of memories; of imagined possible situations, and of the feelings that one would have if… 588. ‘I am revolving the decision to go away to-morrow.’ […]

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Philosophical Investigations,  #193. “The machine as symbolizing its action: the action of a machine – I might say at first – seems to be there in it from the start. What does that mean? – If we know the machine, everything else, that is its movement, seems to be already completely determined. We talk as […]

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from Philosophical Investigations         26. One thinks that learning the language consists in giving names to objects. Viz., to human beings, to shapes, to colors, to pains, to moods, to numbers, etc. To repeat–naming is something like attaching a label to a thing. One can say that this is preparatory to the use of a word. But what for? […]

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