By Max Weber, 1918. THIS lecture, which I give at your request, will necessarily disappoint you in a number of ways. You will naturally expect me to take a position on actual problems of the day. But that will be the case only in a purely formal way and toward the end, when I shall […]

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“There is no absolutely “objective” scientific analysis of culture… All knowledge of cultural reality… is always knowledge from particular points of view. … an “objective” analysis of cultural events, which proceeds according to the thesis that the ideal of science is the reduction of empirical reality to “laws,” is meaningless… [because]… the knowledge of social […]

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 This is a lecture Weber gave in 1918 in Munich: You wish me to speak about ‘Science as a Vocation.’ Now, we political economists have a pedantic custom, which I should like to follow, of always beginning with the external conditions. In this case, we begin with the question: What are the conditions of science […]

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Max Weber lived from 1864 – 1920. He is one of the architects of modern social science, and he deeply influenced sociology and social theory. His approach is interpretative; he is not just focused on the collection of empirical data. He is famous for his book “The Protestant Ethics and the Spirit of Capitalism,” 1934. […]

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