Source: Hegel for Beginners, by Llyod Spencer and Andrzej Krauze, Published by Icon Books. In 1808, Hegel still talked of constructing some sort of bridge between traditional logic set out in classical form by Aristotle and his own. Aristotlean logic had been the standard for 2,000 years. Aristotle (384 BC – 322 BC) perfected a […]

Read More...

Part One: Introduction §1 Philosophy misses an advantage enjoyed by the other sciences. It cannot like them rest the existence of its objects on the natural admissions of consciousness, nor can it assume that its method of cognition, either for starting or for continuing, is one already accepted. The objects of philosophy, it is true, […]

Read More...

It is extremely useful to have access to a guide to Hegel’s philosophical terminology. The glossary below is drawn from the following sources: M. is excellent for this purpose and remains invaluable at all stages in the study of Hegel. There is a helpful glossary in , pp. 273-87. See also H. Kainz’s discussion of […]

Read More...

Sektion 4, A und B. IV. Die Wahrheit der Gewißheit seiner selbst In den bisherigen Weisen der Gewißheit ist dem Bewußtsein das Wahre etwas anderes als es selbst. Der Begriff dieses Wahren verschwindet aber in der Erfahrung von ihm; wie der Gegenstand unmittelbar an sich war, das Seiende der sinnlichen Gewißheit, das konkrete Ding der Wahrnehmung, die […]

Read More...

The website Marxists.org has an extensively researched collection of Hegel texts. The following quotes from Hegel are linked to these texts, so you can read each quote in the context in which it was written, which is very helpful.   When philosophy paints its grey in grey, one form of life has become old, and by means of […]

Read More...

Along with J. G. Fichte and F. W. J. von Schelling, Hegel  (1770-1831) belongs to the period of “German idealism” in the decades following Kant. The most systematic of the post-Kantian idealists, Hegel attempted, throughout his published writings as well as in his lectures, to elaborate a comprehensive and systematic ontology from a “logical” starting point. […]

Read More...

The following quote is from: Daniel Berthold-Bond, Hegel’s Grand Synthesis: A Study of Being, Thought, and History. New York: Harper, 1993, pp. 81-91. The Dialectical Principle Probably more has been written about Hegel’s theory of dialectic than any other aspect of his philosophy. It has been ridiculed as a “primitive schematization system,” [49] and praised […]

Read More...