This fragment was written in 1956. it is published in “Quasi una Fantasia, Essays on Modern Music.” by Theodor W. Adorno. (Translated by Rodney Livingstone), VERSO, London, New York. Adorno compares music and language, and also outlines a theory of modern aesthetics. Here is the text: “Music resembles a language. Expressions such as musical idiom, […]

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Die in dem Buch erkannte Entwicklung zur totalen Integration ist unterbrochen, nicht abgebrochen; sie droht, über Diktaturen und Kriege sich zu vollziehen. Die Prognose des damit verbundenen Umschlags von Aufklärung in Positivismus, den Mythos dessen, was der Fall ist, schließlich die Identität von Intelligenz und Geistfeindschaft hat überwältigend sich bestätigt. Unsere Konzeption der Geschichte wähnt nicht, ihr enthoben zu sein, aber sie jagt nicht positivistisch nach Information. Als Kritik von Philosophie will sie Philosophie nicht preisgeben.

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 Horkheimer/Adorno: Dialectic of Enlightenment Translated by John Cumming. New York, 1989. Textpieces from “Dialectic of Enlightenment.” Myth is already enlightenment; and enlightenment reverts to mythology. p. XVI _____________________ “Everything unknown and alien is primary and undifferentiated: that which transcends the confines of experience; whatever in things is more than their previously known reality. What the […]

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Here is a short biographical sketch of Adorno’s life from the  Stanford Encyclopedia for Philosophy: “Born on September 11, 1903 as Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund, Adorno lived in Frankfurt am Main for the first three decades of his life and the last two. He was the only son of a wealthy wine merchant of assimilated Jewish […]

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(From: Theodor Adorno, Negative Dialectics, 1969. End.) The question is whether metaphysics as a knowledge of the absolute is at all possible without the construction of an absolute knowledge – without that idealism which supplied the title for the last chapter of Hegel’s Phenomenology. Is a man who deals with the absolute not necessarily claiming […]

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Philosophie, die einmal überholt schien, erhält sich am Leben, weil der Augenblick ihrer Verwirklichung versäumt ward. (Philosophy, which once seemed obsolete, lives on because the moment to realize it was missed.) (Theodor Adorno) REASON AND THE SUBJECT OF PHILOSOPHY. Truth kills, Nietzsche once advised philosophers, and he added: indeed, it kills itself.[1] We always knew that the […]

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