Source: Published by Continuum 1974. Crimes committed in the name of God are a recurrent theme in the history of Christian Europe. The ancients practiced torture and murder in war, on slaves (who were supplied by the wars) and as a form of entertainment: the circenses. But in spiritual matters the emperors were relatively tolerant. […]

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The State is not the supreme incarnation of the Idea, as Hegel believed; the State is not a kind of collective superman; the State is but an agency entitled to use power and coercion, and made up of experts or specialists in public order and welfare, an instrument in the service of man. Putting man at the service of that instrument is political perversion. The human person as an individual is for the body politic and the body politic is for the human person as a person. But man is by no means for the State. The State is for man.

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Father Frederick C. Copleston (Jesuit Catholic priest) versus Bertrand Russell (agnostic philosopher.) (The portion on “Contingency” is slightly edited.) This debate was a Third Program broadcast of the British Broadcasting Corporation in 1948. It was reprinted in several sources. Summary Copleston put forward his argument which concentrates simply on contingency. There are things in the […]

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This official text of the Catholic Church on New Age movement is the result of a six-year study on the New Age movement. It was published in 2003, and is critical of the movement. The Vatican theologians consider New Age philosophies to be based on “weak thought” and highlight the differences between Catholic thought and the New Age […]

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Summary of Christian Beliefs It’s hard to define what Christian belief actually includes. The following list is modeled after the Catholic Church requirements;  other Christian groups may not agree with everything on this list. That there is one supreme, eternal, infinite God, the Creator of heaven and earth. That the good will be rewarded by him […]

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Thanks to modern science, we now know more about religious history than ever: Scientific archaeology began in the 18th century, and since then excavators have been discovering and interpreting evidence, ranging from tiny goddess figurines carved from mammoth ivory to entire sacred landscapes, such as at the Giza plateau in Egypt. The archeological evidence enhances and […]

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