Achilles, the hero of the Iliad, is one of the most famous Greeks: He is the exemplary warrior who leads the Greeks to victory against Troy, but he is also emotionally unbalanced. He falls in love, he is easily angered, he becomes passive-aggressive, and finally he is so enraged that he goes on a killing spree. […]

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“Antigone” is a tragedy by Sophocles, written on or before 441 BC. It is the third of a trilogy of Theban plays, but it was written chronologically first. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus’ “Seven Against Thebes” ends. The Theban plays consist of three plays: Oedipus the King […]

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The Zen teacher says, “The secret is in you.  You are the secret.” What does it mean? The truth offered in these two short sentences is cryptic, and almost tautological. The meaning of my search for truth is in me. If I have found myself, the secret is gone, because I have realized that it was in me all along. […]

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The proverbs of China form an embodied philosophy; they transmit a common-sense approach to life mixed with a deep sense of humor, and compassion for failure. The origins of most these sayings and quotes are lost in the mists of time; some appear to be related to comments by Confucius and other ancient sages. Some […]

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The whole text is only one sentence. It describes the story of a ghost ship that appears to a young boy. He saw a very large ship without light and sound, moving towards sandy beach near the village. The boy saw the ship breaking and sinking into the sea. The boy thought that he had a bad dream in the previous night as he didn’t see any wreckage at the place where the ship broke into pieces. The next year, the boy saw the same ship appearing at the same place and sinking like before. Now he was sure that he wasn’t dreaming. He told his mother about the ship but she didn’t believe him and thought her son became crazy. Then, something happened to his mother.

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Petrarch’s motives for climbing Mount Ventoux – to see the view – is often cited as the mark of a new humanistic “Renaissance” spirit. His ascent took place on April 26, 1336, but it was  written and published only around 1350.  Hans Blumenberg describes Petrarch’s ascent of Ventoux  in  “The Legitimacy of the Modern Age:”  […]

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Biography: (See also the Wikipedia Article about Rumi.) Rumi (1207–1273) was a 13th-century Persian (Tajik) Muslim poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic. He is also known as “Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī,” or as Mevlānā in Turkey and Mawlānā in Iran and Afghanistan. Rūmī is a descriptive name meaning “Roman” since he lived most of his life in […]

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