Introduction to the poem from the Wikipedia: “Auden’s poem is written in two different stanza forms, one form with shorter lines, the other with longer lines. The stanzas with shorter lines describe the making of the shield by the god Hephaestus, and report the scenes that Achilles’ mother, the Nereid Thetis, expects to find on the shield and […]

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Hell, it’s about time someone told about my friend EPICAC. After all, he cost the taxpayers $776,434,927.54. They have a right to know about him, picking up a check like that. EPICAC got a big send off in the papers when Dr. Ormand von Kleigstadt designed him for the Government people. Since then, there hasn’t […]

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This poem by W. H. Auden (1907-1973), marks the beginning of World War II, which started with the German invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939. He is an analyst of the times, and his deep insights are as true today as they were in September 1939: Those to whom evil is done, do evil in return… […]

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Source: Volume 1. Leo Lowenthal, published by Transaction Books, 1984. Leo Löwenthal (1900-1993) was a sociologist associated with the Frankfurt School. He began his career by joining the Institute for Social Research in 1927 and became managing editor of its journal Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung. Soon thereafter he migrated to the United States where he held […]

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Achilles, the hero of the Iliad, is one of the most famous Greeks: He is the exemplary warrior who leads the Greeks to victory against Troy, but he is also emotionally unbalanced. He falls in love, he is easily angered, he becomes passive-aggressive, and finally he is so enraged that he goes on a killing spree. […]

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Ein Lied in der Wüste Ein Kranz ward gewunden aus schwärzlichem Laub in der Gegend von Akra: dort riß ich den Rappen herum und stach nach dem Tod mit dem Degen. Auch trank ich aus hölzernen Schalen die Asche der Brunnen von Akra und zog mit gefälltem Visier den Trümmern der Himmel entgegen. Denn tot […]

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It is amazing that somebody in 1909 could predict our Internet age with such accuracy. This short story by E.M. Forster is a chilling account of the role of technology in our lives. Written in 1909, it’s as relevant today as the day it was published. Forster had several visions of the future that materialized […]

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